Art in the Week That Was

A selection of creative current affairs which have hit the headlines in the last week…

Goldie may have revealed Banksy's true identity this week...

Goldie may have revealed Banksy’s true identity this week…

The Summer has officially begun, with major events now cropping up on the UK social calendar promoting opportunities aplenty to get creative with fashion, poetry, music and art.

From Glastonbury Festival to Royal Ascot, the general public are getting playful with their event wardrobes as reported in the press this week.  The better-than-average June weather prompted modern festival wear comprising fluro/sequins/metallic/feathers to be merged with hot pants, bikinis, Lennon-esque shades and copious facial hair for the gents.  While Ascot’s Ladies’ Day gave rise to similarly eclectic, structural combinations adorning sharply-angled millinery.  At the former, Katy Perry – steeling her somewhat eclectic new image – sported a silver sequin catsuit embellished with blue eye motif a la Aleister Crowley.  A particularly stunning performance was proffered by poet and musician Kate Tempest (@katetempest), who moved the crowd and sofa-bound audience alike with her emotive strike at Theresa May and Rupert Murdoch.  ‘Strong and stable, into ruin’ she mused during her set on Glastonbury’s West Holts stage.

Katy Perry performs at Glastonbury 2017 sporting one of her individualistic stage costume choices...

Katy Perry performs at Glastonbury 2017 in another striking costume choice…

With musicians-a-plenty in the worldwide media, Drum and Bass DJ Goldie was interviewed in the podcast ‘Distraction Pieces’ and therein sprung a surprise revelation…  He appeared to intimate that the infamously-anonymous Street-Artist-cum-Political-Commentator Banksy is infact Robert del Naja from the popular band Massive Attack.  Whilst discussing attempts to cash-in on Banksy’s works, Goldie said:

‘Give me a bubble letter and put it on a t-shirt and write ‘Banksy’ on it and we’re sorted.  We can sell it now… No disrespect to Robert – I think he is a brilliant artist.  I think he has flipped the world of art over…’…

Appearing to realise his faux pas, he then changed the subject and the interview continued.  Del Naja has previously been in the frame as a Banksy contender, with fans spotting the pattern of his street art adorning sites contemporaneous with Massive Attack gigs.

Brooklyn Beckham received negative reviews this week concerning his new photographic offering.  Entitled ‘What I See’, the celebrity teen’s reportage collection was critically derided for its apparent lack of quality photography or poignant commentary.  However, his young fan base remained strongly-supportive of his efforts, cheerleading him with their complementary Tweets.  His publisher – Penguin Random House – have come out in praise for the book, stating it a fitting publication for its dedicated teenage demographic.

Brooklyn Beckham's photographic journal received negative reviews...

Brooklyn Beckham’s new photographic journal ‘What I See’ received negative reviews…

Staff at the Tate Modern and Tate Britain were stunned this week when they were officially asked to donate to outgoing Director Nicholas Serota’s leaving gift.  Apparently a keen sailor, the notice advised:

‘We have thought long and hard about what to get and decided to put money towards a sailing boat.’…

The museum partnership is currently embroiled in pay disputes due to the management team coming under fire for contracting out jobs to Securitas, who purportedly do not pay the London living wage.

The ‘Queer British Art’ exhibition continued at the Tate Britain, Westminster.  According to Time Out Magazine, the draw is ‘the shadow of illegality and widespread prejudice that’s cast over everything on display in this rich and fascinating survey of queer art.’.  Running until Sunday, 1st October, the show’s text panels make for an interesting read: from unrequited love to secret affairs.  This exhibition proves inspiring for artists, philosophers, social commentators and rights activists alike.

'Bathing' by Duncan Grant, 1911. Part of the '' exhibition, Tate Britain.

‘Bathing’ by Duncan Grant, 1911. Part of the ‘Queer British Art’ exhibition, Tate Britain.

[Credits: chicagofashionblogs.com; zimbio.com; thefashionisto.com; theweek.co.uk; timeout.com]

 

 

 

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